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Political Cartoons in Social Studies instruction A guide to teaching with Political Cartoons in the Classroom While many of us think of cartoons as something entertaining or funny, Political Cartoons in contrast are often rather serious. Political cartoons address an array of issues from local city government concerns to global issues. Political Cartoon also not “stand-alones”. They usually require a significant amount of prior knowledge to understand what the cartoonist is trying to say. For example: Starbucks had a series of political cartoons that came out addressing that generally addressed what the cartoonists as bias against people of color. These cartoons are dependent on the reader being aware of the April 2018 Philadelphia Starbucks incident. Common characteristics of Political Cartoons: -Characteratures of those involved. For example: A president might be drawn as having an oversized stomach, big ears, etc.. -often try to show the ignorance or blatant arrogance of those in power -sometimes show hypocracy of government, laws, or leadership Sources for Political Cartoons The Washington Post. The Washington Post is based in Washington DC and therefore has an array of US government political cartoons. The Week political cartoons. Also very USA government focused. USA today political cartoons. A wide array of cartoons with several beyond DC government. US News and World Report political cartoons with both a US and world focus. Political Cartoon Ideas for students: The environment (community, naitonal, global) Education (their own school policies, President/Government/Leaders War International Relations Racial Injustice, Social injustice, Women’s Rights
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Political Cartoons in Social Studies instruction A guide to teaching with Political Cartoons in the Classroom While many of us think of cartoons as something entertaining or funny, Political Cartoons in contrast are often rather serious. Political cartoons address an array of issues from local city government concerns to global issues. Political Cartoon also not “stand-alones”. They usually require a significant amount of prior knowledge to understand what the cartoonist is trying to say. For example: Starbucks had a series of political cartoons that came out addressing that generally addressed what the cartoonists as bias against people of color. These cartoons are dependent on the reader being aware of the April 2018 Philadelphia Starbucks incident. Common characteristics of Political Cartoons: -Characteratures of those involved. For example: A president might be drawn as having an oversized stomach, big ears, etc.. -often try to show the ignorance or blatant arrogance of those in power -sometimes show hypocracy of government, laws, or leadership Sources for Political Cartoons The Washington Post. The Washington Post is based in Washington DC and therefore has an array of US government political cartoons. The Week political cartoons. Also very USA government focused. USA today political cartoons. A wide array of cartoons with several beyond DC government. US News and World Report political cartoons with both a US and world focus. Political Cartoon Ideas for students: The environment (community, naitonal, global) Education (their own school policies, President/Government/Leaders War International Relations Racial Injustice, Social injustice, Women’s Rights
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